Wellness Isn’t Measured on a Scale

Trevor

19 Posts Published

Date

April 22, 2019

…our wellness is not measured on a scale and it certainly isn’t measured by comparing our own wellness against someone else’s.

A while back we got a new bathroom scale. Our old one wasn’t great, and apparently it was much more friendly toward me. When I stepped on the new scale it revealed that the measurement I had been using was off by 11 pounds. Eleven. Pounds.

I wanted to take the scale back immediately and return to my old beloved (and lying) scale. The news of 11 additional pounds kind of rocked me if I’m honest. I had previously been operating with the idea that I still needed to lose about 15 pounds to reach my goal weight, but this new reality was telling me that I needed to lose 26 pounds. I’m not gonna lie—I pouted.

For the last several years I have been on a quest for wellness in my life. Three or four years ago I began a monthly practice of meeting with a spiritual director. I took a month long sabbatical from ministry. I began making more intentional time for my family. I have continued to exercise several times a week in a community setting. I participated in a 6-week Mindfulness class on meditation. I take self-care days monthly to be outside, enjoy nature, and clear my head. 

Sometimes in life we fall into the trap of measuring with the wrong metrics. When we measure the satisfaction or wellness in our life in comparison to others, we will typically find out that we’re off by quite a bit just like my old scale. Wellness isn’t measured on a scale, though. None of the above steps that I’ve added to my life can be measured in a quantifiable way, and it certainly doesn’t show up on my new bathroom scale. Wellness is more about the quality of the moments in your life—it’s qualitative. It’s about experiences and moments and peace and satisfaction.

Often we feel a sense of guilt when we measure ourselves by others, but our wellness is not measured on a scale and it certainly isn’t measured by comparing our own wellness against someone else’s. Find your own measurement. Take care of your self. Work with a friend or significant other who can help in monitoring your progress and will hold you accountable to that personal measurement. 

What wellness metrics do you use?

What steps have you recently taken (no matter big or small) to improve your wellness?

 

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